Talcum Powder and Ovarian Cancer

Made primarily from the mineral talc, talcum powder is used in baby and facial powders, body powders, cosmetics, feminine washes, and other consumer products. Talcum powder absorbs moisture and is often used to help reduce fabric chafing against the skin. But products containing talcum powder have been linked to an increased risk of ovarian cancer in women.

Ferrer, Poirot & Wansbrough can help if you or your family member developed ovarian cancer after using talcum powder. We’re here to protect your rights to compensation for your pain and suffering, medical bills, and lost wages. We’re available to speak with you 24 hours a day, seven days a week—just dial (800) 210-8503 or complete a free initial consultation form.

Talc Powder Cancer Risk

While talc can naturally contain asbestos, a cancer-causing substance, consumer products containing talc have been asbestos-free since the 1970s. But recent research shows that modern, asbestos-free talc products may increase the risk of ovarian cancer in women when used in the genital area.

Talc doesn’t break down in the body, and it can travel through a woman’s vagina, uterus, and fallopian tubes into her ovaries, causing irritation and possibly cancer. The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies the genital use of talc-based body powder as “possibly carcinogenic to humans.”

$127 Million in Talc Powder Cancer Lawsuit Verdicts

In 2016, jurors awarded the family of a 62-year-old woman who died from ovarian cancer a landmark $72 million in damages. According to court records, the victim had used talcum powder products for feminine hygiene for more than three decades.

During trial, evidence showed Johnson & Johnson, the talcum powder manufacturer, knew about the ovarian cancer risk for decades but failed to warn consumers.

Less than three months later, in May 2016, Johnson & Johnson faced its second consecutive trial loss. A Missouri jury found the company liable for $55 million in damages to a woman diagnosed with ovarian cancer after she routinely used the company’s talcum powder for decades. Now in remission, the victim required a hysterectomy and other surgical procedures as part of her treatment.

More than 1,200 other victims and their families have filed lawsuits now pending in state courts.

What talc products should I know about?

Products used in the genital area that can contain talc include:

  • baby powder,
  • body powders, such as Shower to Shower®,
  • condoms,
  • diaphragms,
  • feminine washes,
  • sanitary napkins,
  • tampons,
  • and vaginal deodorants.

Talcum and Cancer FAQ

Our drug injury lawyers are here to answer your questions about talc powder and cancer. Some of the questions we’re often asked include:

  • Does talcum powder cause ovarian cancer?

    Talc contains asbestos in its natural form, which can cause cancer when inhaled. But talc in consumer products—such as body powders and feminine hygiene products—has been asbestos-free for more than three decades.

    Research into whether or not asbestos-free talc causes cancer is ongoing, but the American Cancer Society states that a combination of data from 16 studies concluded that women who use talc products face a 30 percent higher risk of developing ovarian cancer than women who don’t use talc.

Interested in learning more? Click here to find answers to other frequently asked questions about talcum powder cancer risks.

Experience You Can Trust

Ferrer, Poirot & Wansbrough has more than 30 years of experience holding corporations accountable when their negligence causes injuries. If you or a loved one developed ovarian cancer after using talcum powder, we’re here to fight for you. You won’t pay unless we get money for you. So don’t wait, contact our defective product lawyers today.

Shower to Shower® is a registered trademark of Valeant Consumer Products and is used here only to identify the product in question.

This law firm is not associated with, sponsored by, or affiliated with the International Agency for Research on Cancer; Johnson & Johnson; Reuters; or Valeant Consumer Products.