Keyless Ignition Systems Could Lead to Fatal Carbon Monoxide Buildup

by Staff Blogger | May 15th, 2018

Being able to start or stop your vehicle with the touch of a button is both convenient and practical. However, the safety of that feature depends on its reliability, and recent reports suggest that not all vehicles shut off when drivers or passengers exit them with keys in hand.

Per a report by the New York Times, keyless ignition systems are standard in more than half of the 17 million vehicles sold every year in the U.S. The keys work by transmitting radio signals from their fobs to the electrical systems of the vehicles, and when the keys are in close proximity to those systems, the vehicles can be started with the touch of a button.

But a combination of vehicles with quiet engines and engines that don’t always shut off when keys are taken from vehicle interiors means that many vehicle owners and their families face extreme dangers—especially when vehicles are parked in garages.

Vehicles that aren’t shut off may continue to run for hours, causing a deadly concentration of carbon monoxide to buildup inside garages. Eventually, the gas may even seep into homes, putting families at risk for fatal inhalation-related complications.

At Ferrer, Poirot & Wansbrough, it’s our goal to product innocent victims from the hidden and not-so-hidden dangers lurking in many common consumer products. Get in touch with our defective product lawyers today for a free consultation to find out how we can help you maximize your chances of getting full compensation.