What’s the Difference Between a Drug Recall and a Drug Withdrawal?

by Staff Blogger | February 20th, 2018

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has already recalled several drugs in 2018. Many recalled drugs are Class I recalls, which are the most serious and include medications that have a “reasonable probability” to result in severe adverse health consequences or death.

However, many recalls by the FDA are only suggestions. That means drug companies don’t necessarily have to comply—at least not right away. Because of that, there are many drugs still on the market, including on pharmacy shelves, in doctor’s offices, and in hospitals, that are conclusively linked to serious health problems and complications.

As bad as that is, there’s another action the FDA can take when the risks posed by medications outweigh their potential benefits: withdrawals. If the FDA gets enough evidence that suggests a drug is too dangerous to remain on the market, it can ask its manufacturer to withdraw it from the market. A withdrawal is more serious than a recall, as it makes the drug unavailable for purchase at pharmacies or for use in doctor’s offices and hospitals.

At Ferrer, Poirot & Wansbrough, our drug injury lawyers know that both recalled and withdrawn drugs can pose serious dangers to the people who take them. It’s our goal to help people who were hurt by prescription medications get the compensation they deserve for their medical bills and lost wages.

Don’t wait to get the experienced and dedicated legal advocacy you and your loved ones need. Call us today for a free consultation.