medical device injury

GE Healthcare’s Nuclear Imaging System Recalled Due To Patient Safety Risk

by Staff Blogger | August 6th, 2013

August 6, 2013

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is initiating a voluntary recall on GE Healthcare’s Infinia Hawkeye 4 Nuclear Imaging System because of a serious risk to patient safety posed by the Defective Medical Device.

The unit is comprised of several different cameras and imaging systems that use signals from radioactive isotopes injected into a patient’s body to create different images. The information and data gathered by the machine is useful in diagnosing conditions, such as certain cancers.

However, a camera mounted to an arm by bolts and screws may not be securely fastened, which can allow the camera to fall and strike patients. According to an article from Mass Device, one such accident recently caused the death of a 66-year-old patient at a Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare facility.

The incident prompts many to wonder what a person who is injured by a medical device should do.

The Medical Product Liability Attorneys with the law firm of Ferrer, Poirot & Wansbrough explain that anyone injured by a malfunctioning piece of medical equipment should first seek the medical treatment they need to heal. Once they have received care, a victim should then gather as much information as possible about the device in question, as well as their diagnosis and treatment. Finally, the individual should contact a qualified attorney to discuss legal options for seeking compensation from those responsible for their injuries.

Heparin-filled syringes recalled due to serious health risk

by fpw | January 28th, 2008

A North Carolina company has issued a nationwide recall of heparin and saline pre-filled syringes because people in several states have become seriously ill due to a bacterial infection found in the syringes. The syringes are used for a variety of home medical uses, such as cleaning out catheter tubes.

The bacterial contaminant is known as Serratia marcescens, which according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), “could present a serious adverse health consequence that could lead to life-threatening injuries and/or death.”

The bacteria can potentially cause serious Texas personal injury and death.

Click here to read more http://www.fda.gov/oc/po/firmrecalls/am2pat01_08.html