What Makes Opioids So Dangerous?

Opioids have been spotlighted in local and national news lately due to the painkiller crisis that has affected America for now more than a decade. The Washington Post reports that drug companies shipped 76 billion oxycodone and hydrocodone pills to communities throughout America between 2006 and 2012 alone.

Per capita, most of the pills went to rural, working-class communities and cities in the South, with areas in West Virginia and Kentucky receiving more than 100 pills per resident. Federal data indicates that both legal and illegal forms of opioids are factors in more than 400,000 deaths in the U.S. from 2000 through 2018.

At Ferrer, Poirot & Wansbrough, we know how devastating and widespread the opioid epidemic is in America. Our drug injury lawyers have fought for the rights of many people who affected by opioids due to health problems and addictions affecting themselves or their loved ones.

Opioids are particularly dangerous for multiple reasons, including:

  • Slowed breathing and heart rate—Taking low doses of opioids can treat patients’ pain while also making them feel relaxed and sleepy. As patients eventually require higher dosages to achieve the same effects, they face a higher risk of potentially fatal respiratory depression.
  • Addiction potential—Opioids are extremely addictive, both physically and psychologically. Patients may need them just to feel normal, but they also crave them due to the intense euphoria and feelings of relaxation that they produce.

If you or someone you love was harmed by opioids, you need experienced legal representation on your side. Contact us today for a free consultation.